Preemie Jace Perkins rocks ’n rolls through 137 days in the NICU

Melyssa Perkins was 25 weeks into a healthy pregnancy with her first child when she began to have abdominal pain. She called her local nurse who said she was probably dehydrated, but when water didn’t help and the pain increased, Melyssa and her husband Jamie rushed to nearby Beverly Hospital, where they discovered that she was fully dilated.

“I don’t think I said one word at that point. I was in complete shock,” recalls Melyssa. Two hours after the couple arrived at the hospital, their son Jace was born at 1lb. 12 oz. Beverly Hospital stabilized Jace and arranged for immediate transport to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Boston Children’s Hospital.

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What Can I do to Protect My Kids from Seeing Inappropriate Fashion Catalogs?

Michael RichQ: I recently received the Spring 2015 Catalog from the department store Barneys New York. The catalog was sent to my house without any envelope or sleeve to protect it from being opened by kids, even though it contains pictures that I believe are inappropriate for young children. What can be done to prevent such mailings in the future? Are there any laws that govern how such catalogs are sent?

– Mad about mail, USA

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Kidney swap saves two lives, eternally links two families

Dillon and his mom

When Dillon McCarty was 13, he received a very special gift from his stepfather Nicholas Gula—a new kidney.

But Gula, 34, didn’t donate his kidney to Dillon. Instead, he gave it to a stranger, a 29-year-old man also in need of a kidney transplant in Atlanta. And in return, the man’s wife gave her kidney to Dillon.

The carefully choreographed “operation” involved two selfless donors, two flights, two states, three hospitals and four surgeries—more than one thousand miles apart—inexplicably tying two families.

“It was a dream,” says Gula. “I was saving two lives. Words can’t even express how I felt.”

The reason for the kidney exchange was simple. To be a match, a donor’s blood type and antibody testing must be compatible with the recipient. Dillon had relatives—including his stepfather—who were willing to donate, but those donors were incompatible. Only his mother Samantha McCarty was a match, but not one that would work for Dillon.

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Can medical marijuana help kids with autism or ADHD?

Dr. Scott Hadland is a general pediatrician and adolescent specialist at Boston Children's Hospital and recently published a review on marijuana and developmental and pediatric conditions.
Dr. Scott Hadland is a general pediatrician and adolescent specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital and recently published a review on marijuana and developmental and pediatric conditions.

Marijuana policy in the United States is changing rapidly, with some states (including every state in New England) legally allowing marijuana to be used for medical reasons. Washington State and Colorado recently voted to allow the recreational use of marijuana, and Massachusetts may hold a similar ballot measure in 2016. It’s no surprise, then, that many parents wonder whether marijuana might have any benefits for certain pediatric conditions, and whether it’s safe for children.

A quick Facebook search shows that a number of groups have cropped up calling for medical marijuana for conditions like autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Some of these online groups point to studies showing that medical marijuana is helpful in these conditions. Other groups tell compelling stories about a child who was struggling with autism whose behavior was dramatically better after being treated with marijuana.

Before doctors recommend a new treatment, we always make sure that carefully conducted studies have answered two critical questions. First, does the treatment actually work? And second, is it harmful? In essence, we need to be sure that the benefits outweigh the risks.

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