Stories about: our patients’ stories

Two hip dysplasia surgeries feed Anna’s interest in medicine

Anna_BradshawBoston Children’s Hospital strives to create a comfortable, supportive environment for all of its patients. Still, most can’t wait to leave the sterile hospital halls and return to the comfort of their own homes. Anna, a 20-year-old college student from N.H., has other thoughts.

“I can’t wait to come back to Boston Children’s.”

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Remembering one of Boston Children’s earliest liver transplants

Mick-4When Michael “Mick” Devlin was born in 1987, his parents were sure of two things: They loved him, and they would cherish every minute they had together because no one knew how many they had left.

Mick was born with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, a genetic disorder that disrupts the liver’s ability to break down protein and eventually leads to a toxic build up of ammonia in the blood. It’s a very serious condition, and when Mick was born there weren’t many sustainable treatment options for OTC deficiency. Many children with the disease died.

Needless to say, when Mick’s parents Cathy and Michael held their newborn son and learned about his OTC deficiency, they were terrified. And while they didn’t know it at the time, their son would soon be one of the first children in New England to receive a successful liver transplant—a surgery that would eventually save his life, and the lives of thousands of children to follow.

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Our patients’ stories: From patient to advocate

Rachael today post transplantRachael Adler is not the kind of person who stands around waiting for life to happen. At 13, she’s a good student who participates in many school and community service events. And despite her young age, she’s been a key speaker at events held by both The New York Alliance for Donation (NYAD) and the Northeast Kidney Foundation.

But Rachael didn’t get to be the strong, active young person she is today without overcoming adversity first—and overcoming that adversity is playing a big role in helping shape the person she wants to become.

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A patient and doctor team come full circle

Kate-1Kate Franklin was just three and a half years old in August 2000 when her mother Emily brought her to the Boston Children’s Hospital emergency room, because she was bruising easily and couldn’t seem to shake a strep throat. Loren Walensky, MD, PhD, had just started his fellowship in pediatric hematology/oncology the month before, and that night Kate Franklin became one of the first patients he diagnosed with cancer. When Walensky told Emily Franklin that her daughter had leukemia, the mother placed her hands on the doctor’s shoulders, and, in a moment that Walensky says he will never forget, she said, “I will see you at her wedding.”

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