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smoking

Pink cigarette ads target teenage girls

by Boston Children's Hospital staff on April 5, 2010

Camel No. 9by Dafna Lemish, PhD

The “pinkification” of girls’ culture – their clothes, toys and accessories – is a booming and relatively recent marketing strategy, marking girls as “cute” and thus very different than boys, who are “tough.” Walk into any clothing or toy store or go online and try to buy something for your daughter that’s not pink. Check your favorite online shopping sites.

But pink has recently shown up in a more insidious and dangerous place: cigarette packaging. The “pink campaign” by Camel cigarettes was introduced in 2007 to appeal directly to pre-teen girls by exploiting a color associated with this age and gender group. Full story »

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Fire safety for your family

by Lois Lee, MD, MPH on February 17, 2010

Lois Lee, MD, MPH

Lois Lee, MD, MPH

Lois Lee, MD, MPH works in Children’s Emergency Department Injury Prevention Program

The city of Boston recently celebrated the fact that no citizens within the city died as a result of a house fire in 2009—the first year with no deaths since 1972, when the Fire Department started keeping records about fire-related deaths. It seems to me in 2010 that deaths from house fires should be a phenomenon of an earlier century, but sadly this is not true. Full story »

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Other stories we’ve been reading:

Adolescents taking a certain anti-psychotic drugs are at an increased risk for diabetes. An industrial chemical is being sold as a dietary supplement for autism treatment. Diabetes drugs are helping dieting teens lose weight. [Read Minnie’s story about living with Type 2 diabetes.]

Loving foster homes improves children’s attention and impulsivity. Girls with ADHD are more likely to develop other mental health risks.

Obese boys are more likely to begin puberty later in life. A Girl Scouts’ survey found that the fashion industry pressures girls to be thin. [Read about unrealistic media images and how one teen feels about them.] Boys are treated with growth hormone therapy much more often than girls.

Babies of mothers who smoke during pregnancy are much more stressed out. [Read how dangerous secondhand smoke is to children.] Black and Hispanic infants are more likely to have HIV. Expectant mothers can receive pregnancy tips through texting.

Girls who bike to school are in better shape than those who walk or get a ride. The USDA is tightening requirements to assure school lunch safety.[Read about our nation’s fight for kids’ food.]  Overloaded backpacks set your child up for spine strain. [Read about National School Backpack Awareness Day.]

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Health headlines: Fitness supplements, ecstasy use and tongue-powered wheelchairs

by Boston Children's Hospital staff on January 30, 2010

Other stories we’ve been reading:

Multi Vitamin MadnessMore high school athletes are using fitness supplements with knowledge of their harmful effects. Parents don’t have to be fit in order for their kids to be fit – supporting your kids’ physical activity is what motivates them to be physically fit.

Scheduling recess before lunch is helping students and teacher alike. Menus with calorie listings have parents picking healthier options for their kids but not necessarily for themselves.

Parents who feel burned out at work are more likely to have kids who feel burned out at school. If parents use complementary or alternative therapies, their children are more likely to use them too. [Read our blog post on insurance coverage for alternative therapies.] Did you know that your child is more likely to have a mental disorder if you –as a parent – are bipolar?

cigarettesHigh cholesterol is putting 20 percent of teens at risk for heart disease. Healthy kids are more likely to die from ecstasy use than regular drug users. If your child smokes cigarettes, it’s much more likely that pot is next.

Toilet seat dermatitis is on the rise. Vaccinating babies against rotavirus could save two million lives a year. [Read our blog post on this year’s updated immunization schedule.] Female teachers might pass on math anxiety to girl students.

Teen pregnancies and abortions are on the rise. Parents shouldn’t be concerned if their children hear voices. There’s a new wheelchair that powered by the user’s tongue.

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This week on Thrive: Jan. 11 – 15

by Boston Children's Hospital staff on January 17, 2010

Children’s research made the Huffington Post’s Top 10 Medical Research Trends to Watch in 2010. We find out exactly how dangerous secondhand smoke is to children. Are American destined to be obese? Two studies show how important a good night’s sleep for your children is. A gene for a devastating kidney disease is discovered. Do you know the dangers of leaving your child in the car alone? Dr. Rich responds to comments on his Call of Duty post. Have Americans finally hit an obesity plateau? The Flu Fighters invade Facebook. Children’s sends a team into Haiti and we offer advice on how to talk to your children about this devastating event.

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Exactly how dangerous is secondhand smoke to children?

by Boston Children's Hospital staff on January 11, 2010

Mom smoking cigarette around childby Lawrence Rhein, MD, director of the Center for Healthy Infant Lung Development

Most people know that smoking is bad for the people who light up a cigarette and inhale. And most non-smokers know that inhaling someone else’s smoke can be unpleasant. But is it dangerous?

High in toxic chemicals, secondhand smoke causes or contributes to many health problems, including heart disease, cancer, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). A new study, out this month, adds to the growing evidence that exposure to secondhand smoke is especially concerning for children. Full story »

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Other children’s health stories we’ve been reading:

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